Post
A thangka of blood

A dispatch from troubled Tibet, and a return to blogging in China

 

Dorjee Lhundup, a father of two in his mid-twenties, made his living painting the religious thangka scrolls – clouds, mountains and deities in bright reds, blues, whites and gold – that Rebgong county in the historical Tibetan province of Amdo is famous for. In death his charred body was as colourful, wrapped in orange, violet and white khatas, the ceremonial scarf. He set himself on fire last Sunday.

READ ON...

Post
Hunt for the red dolphin

They may look friendly, but they're stone cold killers

 

In the resort towns of the Crimea, holidaymakers from the heartlands of Russia laze on short beaches of lumpy shingle, the Black Sea lapping at their feet. They lie on straw mats, fat red bellies up like beached manatees, hardly a gap visible between them. Occasionally one turns over, like a pancake flipping itself on the hob.

READ ON...

Post
A Chinese spring?

Thoughts on revolution and reform by a Chinese student in Cairo

 

Ongoing uprisings in Arab countries have led policymakers, journalists and investors to speculate about China’s potential for instability. They try to identify indicators for the country’s elusive future and reach conclusions that waver between two extremes. Some observers emphasise the regime’s vulnerability, positing that social and political movements in Arab countries will spark unrest among Chinese youth.

READ ON...

Post
Children of Asia

A photo essay from young Asia's little visited corners

 

Matuail landfill, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2010

READ ON...

Post
I look at you Shanghai

A new poem from the land of expat

 

I look at you Shanghai. I look at you, you look away.

READ ON...